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bambini
15-09-2010, 11:41 AM
Following on from this thread (http://www.ukcigarforums.com/showthread.php?p=112795#post112795), I was wondering if I could get some advice on whiskies. Much like I trained myself to like tea as I figured I wasn't English enough if I didn't drink it, I'm thinking of training myself to like whisky as I'm not cool/masculine enough if I don't drink it ;)

So here's are some questions:
1) what would be a good, inexpensive first bottle? I like spirits, particularly brandy, but my experiences with whisky have thus far not ended well. I guess I'd want something that would be not so intense as to put me off further.

2) what cigar?

3) Is it whisky or whiskey?

Big_T_UK
15-09-2010, 11:54 AM
http://www.thedrinkshop.com/products/nlpdetail.php?prodid=3612

Seriesteve
15-09-2010, 12:30 PM
Quick Answer ... Malt Whisky ? if so ..
Aberlour 12yr old a classic all rounder, often you'll find deals at Tesco, Asda and Oddbins 25 - 30, and with a Serie D 4 of course :41:
Ss
Loads more later

MarkSDMF
15-09-2010, 12:39 PM
Personally a nice bottle of 10yr old Jura is a great bottle for a beginner with malt.

IF your looking for a cheap cheap bottle maybe try a balvenie 10 yr but id avoid ardbeg etc if you have never really drank malt before.

:)

senor_robusto
15-09-2010, 12:40 PM
hey bambini,
i'd recommend that you'd try a nice irish whisky, such as jamesons or bushmills (original, black bush, 10 or 16 yr old)!!! they're a lot smoother on the palette compared to scotch, which can be quite harsh, overpowering and off putting for a first timer!!! there's some scotch whisky out there that'll make you eyes water...... or worse, chuck your guts!!!! lol.......

yes, go for the irish!!!!

alex:849::rock::smile:

Seriesteve
15-09-2010, 12:47 PM
Personally a nice bottle of 10yr old Jura is a great bottle for a beginner with malt.

IF your looking for a cheap cheap bottle maybe try a balvenie 10 yr but id avoid ardbeg etc if you have never really drank malt before.

:)

Good recommendations :thumb:
I'd agree..... I'm sure you would agree that they are all good, but all different in there own little way, cant wait to try a few whiskys tonight as per usual.
Ss

satch
15-09-2010, 12:59 PM
An easy going whisky is Famous Grouse. Grants is another. Always have deals on them in the big chains. These are blends.
Balvenie, Macallan, Glen Fiddich, Glen Morangie are lightish singles.
If you're not used to whisky approach the Islays with caution.
I think only Scotch(hate that word)is called Whisky, all others acquire the 'e'.
No doubt somebody will say otherwise if I'm wrong!

bambini
15-09-2010, 12:59 PM
Quick Answer ... Malt Whisky ?

I'm sorry, I'm a complete novice. I don't even know what this question means. AFAIK, there are three types of whisky: scotch, Irish and bourbon. Oh, and Southern Comfort which, as I understand it, is peach flavoured (????).

I don't really know what "malt whisky" is over other whiskies, but I've heard the word single malt bandied around here and there. Wow. I really have a lot to learn :confused:

Thanks for all the hot tips though. Going with Irish sounds good, although from what I can tell Irish kinda comes second to Scotch (again, ????).

patrickspark
15-09-2010, 01:04 PM
i'm with senor robusto - a nice jemmy with a little pep !

Seriesteve
15-09-2010, 01:11 PM
I'm sorry, I'm a complete novice. I don't even know what this question means. ).

Ah! Ok well you could start here regards Scotland :thumb:
http://www.scotchwhisky.net/
Ss

MarkSDMF
15-09-2010, 01:13 PM
Personally i dont like Blended whiskey, i cant go it, Makes me rather angry and also the taste is alot more harsh i think. I dont feel you get so many flavours from it but hey, thats just MHO.

I would still say Jura. Its not too expensive, its smooth, flavours galore and just lovely all round. :)

tippexx
15-09-2010, 01:14 PM
although from what I can tell Irish kinda comes second to Scotch (again, ????).


Only in Scotland.

Jamesons and Bushmills are excellent brands to start from.

Monkey Nuts
15-09-2010, 01:42 PM
TheDrinkShop.com have both Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie available in 5cl miniature sizes for about 3 each. You could try one or both of those as they are good quality whiskies that would be an excellent starting point without shelling out too much cash. :smile:

bambini
15-09-2010, 02:07 PM
Good suggestion. Right, I'll read the website suggested by seriesteve, and then buy acouple of short measures of whisky. Or I'll go down the pub and see what's on the shelves :)

Next question: Should I have my whisky on the rocks? Or is that just something you hear in films?

daverave999
15-09-2010, 02:19 PM
You say your experiences with whisky haven't gone well so far. What did you try and what didn't you like about it?
I would never drink it with ice personally, maybe some water with the sweeter ones.

El Catador
15-09-2010, 03:01 PM
You say your experiences with whisky haven't gone well so far. What did you try and what didn't you like about it?
I would never drink it with ice personally, maybe some water with the sweeter ones.

As always, the 'voice of reason' has spoken. http://www.pic4ever.com/images/oregonian_winesmiley.gif
Excellent questions and a good tip. http://www.pic4ever.com/images/icare.gif
Bravo 'Brother Dave'. http://www.pic4ever.com/images/47b20s0.gif


Jock and a Englishman were flying from Edinburgh when the stewardess approached. "May I get you something?" she asked. "Aye, a whusky" Jock replied.
She poured him a drink then asked the Englishman if he'd like one. "Never!" he said sternly. "I'd rather be raped and ravished by whores all the way to America than drink whisky!"
Jock hurriedly passed the drink back, saying "Och, Ah didna ken there wuz a choice!"

http://www.pic4ever.com/images/237.gif oops. . . sorry.

bambini
15-09-2010, 03:03 PM
You say your experiences with whisky haven't gone well so far. What did you try and what didn't you like about it?

Well, I must say it's been a few years since i last tried a whisky, and it may just have been a case of not liking spirits at that time and not being able to handle the strength. I think though, that it was the fact that the ones I tried burnt the back of my throat something chronic (but as I say, I would probably be fine with that nowadays).

I also seem to recall that I found them too bitter. Unlike brandy, which has a sweeter taste and is more tangy, my memory of whisky was of sheer bitterness and heaviness.

I couldn't tell you what I had though.

daverave999
15-09-2010, 03:16 PM
Jura is probably a good suggestion then, thought you may find that you can force anything down after a while. :D
The idea of adding water is to dilute it to about 30% strength so the alcohol doesn't overpower the flavour. I take that to be about a third to a half of the amount of whisky you have. [EDIT-Though it's rare that I bother.]
You may find this superb malt whisky map (https://www.lfw.co.uk/diageo/flavourmap.html) helpful, and a quick glance over the regions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_malt_Scotch#Regions) will make more sense as each area has a characteristic style. I believe single malt means it come from one distillery.

Soulmanure
15-09-2010, 03:47 PM
I'm going to give a word for bourbon--I drink it often, and if you can get a bottle, Woodford Reserve is a fantastic accompaniment to a strong smoke.

Pandyboy
15-09-2010, 07:00 PM
If you spell it whiskey it's Irish. Meaning the water of life. Whisky is used for Scotch. They use different ways to prepare the grain. In Irish it is ventilated so you get a more creamy flavour. In Scotch it is not ventilated and has a more smokey flavour.

If you like Brandy Sainsburys do a very good tase the difference xo cru that jpmoore from the forum recommends.

Enjoy tasting.

Sent from my X10i using Tapatalk

richgirling
15-09-2010, 07:48 PM
If you're not used to whisky approach the Islays with caution.


I strongly agree with that satch.
<O:p</O:p
I would recommend Highland Park for a beginner, nice deep peat flavours but not over powering.

linfield100
15-09-2010, 08:22 PM
Don't bother with the blended one's you can get in most shops. Bell's springs to mind. Bloody awful stuff.
Deanston from Marks & Sparks is a very pleasant malt (One of my favourites). Smokey, Peaty and very smooth. Enjoyed neat with a D4 or RASS is heaven for me.

senor_robusto
15-09-2010, 09:06 PM
hello again bambini,
irish 'whiskey' and scotch 'whisky' are 2 different beasts!!! most scotch whisky i've tried is smokey and peaty tasting, not recommended to drink neat or 'on the rocks'!!!! irish whisky, on the other hand, has, IMO, a more refined, smoother taste that can be enjoyed neat!!!! bushmills, jamesons and tullymore dew are my preffered tipple!!! irish 'honey whiskey liqueurs', such as irish mist and glayva are great to pair up with a nice cigar (probably due to the sweetness)!

now, i'm also quite partial to scotch whisky, such as jura, glenfiddich, glenmorangie etc, and drambuie (a scotch honey whisky) is a great wee drink to have with a cigar!!! when i was a student, i drunk bells and teachers, but took a real sickener after a particularly heavy binge........

as for bourbon, mmmmmm!!! i do like the odd wild turkey, jack daniels (original, single barrell and gentleman jack) and jim beam black label......

as for how to take it, most folk here in belfast who 'enjoy' a good whiskey will only 'introduce it to water' just to take the edge of it!!! avoid adding coke or any other mixers, and ice with whiskey is definitely a faux pas....

other than that, i would definitely agree with a couple of minitures before diving into a full bottle!!!! saying that, that's like giving someone a puff of a good cuban and passing it off as a total experience!!!!!! lol!!!!

whatever you choose, take it easy with it, sip over it (don't act the cowboy and fire them into you, lol) and relax!!!! pair it with a good cigar and enjoy the experience!!!! enjoy......

alex:849::cowboyic9::smile:

bambini
15-09-2010, 09:22 PM
I'm getting a few recommendations for Jamesons or Bushmills as a starting point, so I think I'll start there. Oh, and Payyboy, thanks for the heads up on the Sainsbury's TTD brandy. I'll be sure to check it out.

Thanks y'all. I'll let you know how I get on!

MarkSDMF
15-09-2010, 09:31 PM
I think that after you have tried the Jamesons, I would suggest you try Jura, without a doubt. Im sure you will enjoy it.

Wee tip here when you are drinking it. Take literally a sip and let it sit below your tongue behind your back teeth for a second before a little swirl whirl with some air and then down the hatch. Enjoy it, dont see it as something that people do when they smoke a stick. Please... lol.

Simon-JG-hr
15-09-2010, 09:34 PM
Can't go far wrong with Jameson's/Bushmill's, though there's no denying their lack of complexity when compared to a Scotch (don't get me wrong though, there's some cracking Irish whiskey). Definitely add a couple of ice cubes or a dash of water. Scotch I'd recommend (wholeheartedly), though stay away from the stronger flavoured ones as a beginner (so no heavily peated and super smokey Islays! - much as I love -em). The Glenmorangie Nectar d'Or is an exceptionally smooth (if slightly expensive) range, well worth a try. Otherwise, the bargain of the year, as far as I'm concerned is a bottle of 18 year old Tamdhu for under 32... very smooth an buttery, great flavours, nice finish and good price tag.

(Aplogiles for any typos, just been to a cracking reception for Battle of Britain; so good, in fact, that I was able to avoid any digs at the RAF...)

MarkSDMF
15-09-2010, 09:42 PM
Actually i think the Glenmorangie is a great shout :) :top:

Pandyboy
16-09-2010, 06:12 AM
My favourite mixer with scotch or irish is canada dry. Try it, makes a nice refreshing drink.

Sent from my X10i using Tapatalk

bambini
16-09-2010, 08:05 AM
Jura seems to be cropping up a lot, so I'll add it to my shopping list! Well aren't you a helpful bunch? :smoke:

seanbeer
16-09-2010, 08:18 AM
i keep going back to macallan 18 and Laphorig 10. They have now beoame my house malts. but no guests so far has ever liked the Islay malt. I also like JW black/red labels.

I started off with famous grouse and glenfiddich 10, they are both very easy going.

the trick is to add a dash of water if you find it too strong neat.

MarkSDMF
16-09-2010, 10:31 AM
When im having a half ive never added water or ice.

Infact i think thats a little lie, i've once had a few bits of ice in a lovely half of bunnahabhain :)

Was not too bad but i usually take it straight, like a man :P

bambini
22-09-2010, 12:40 PM
Thought I'd give y'all an update on my whisky adventures.

I tried Laphroaig last night at a friends house. First thoughts were that it smelt like a vet's ;) Then I tasted it and thought "TCP". None of this put me off, but certainly not quite what I expected. Smooth, didn't burn or make me gag, so that was good news :)

My mate then told me to take a large glug, and to hold it in my mouth to allow the other flavours to emerge. O. M. G. Blew me away.

I had my laphroaig with just a dash of water (although my friend told me later that he'd been a bit generous with the water to go easy on me with my first time :)). I still prefer brandy, but I think this is the start of a new friendship with whisky.

MarkSDMF
22-09-2010, 01:31 PM
Well done Bambini, big step to take for your first, propper whisky ;)
Next step is to tryyyyy..... (waiting on answer)

:der: JURA !!??

Well done Bambini!!! You have learned alot in the last week :)
We are proud of you :P

Monkey Nuts
22-09-2010, 02:07 PM
Congratulations Bambini!!

Welcome to an elite club of cigar smoking, whisky drinking gentlemen!!(Assuming you're a man of course!!):welcome:

Next time you're in a pub give a Glenfiddich or Glenmorangie a try (most pubs sell them) and let us know what you make of it. A bit less potent and may be perfect for you :smile:

daverave999
22-09-2010, 02:17 PM
I find Glenmorangie goes very well with a JL2 or a Hoyo du Depute, for what it's worth...

Juniortubed
22-09-2010, 03:00 PM
Try Glenmorangie....nectar of the gods!

bambini
22-09-2010, 03:14 PM
Aww... i feel like a member of a special whisky-themed club :)

I think that either Jamesons (my first Irish), Jura or Glenmorangie will be next - Jura if I buy a bottle, Glenmorangie/Jamesons if I go to a pub that sells it.

mackem keith
22-09-2010, 06:33 PM
Aww... i feel like a member of a special whisky-themed club :)

I think that either Jamesons (my first Irish), Jura or Glenmorangie will be next - Jura if I buy a bottle, Glenmorangie/Jamesons if I go to a pub that sells it.

ahh whisky and cigars great combinations, IMO you started at the very deep end going for the laphroaig as a beginer malt but each to there own ive been drinking whisky for a fair number of years now and still cannot get to like the flavour profiles of the peaty malts the "TCP" factor just doesnt do it for me, speyside whiskies are my favourites though i have to agree with the majority regards the irish whisky they seem to offer a smoother taste albeit they dont have the flavour complexities but still drink excellently well.
matter of fact ive just recently purchased an irish whiskey "redbreast 12yo" and its one of the best whiskies ive tried in a long time very sweet smooth taste highly recommended..

MarkSDMF
22-09-2010, 10:13 PM
Yeah, Go ahead Bambini... Buy a bottle of Jura, Go on... GOO onn... GO ON GO ON GO ON !

Whats the worst that can happen eh ?

;)
If it goes horribly wrong ill happily take the bottle off your hands :P

bambini
23-09-2010, 11:56 AM
Yeah, Go ahead Bambini... Buy a bottle of Jura, Go on... GOO onn... GO ON GO ON GO ON !

Whats the worst that can happen eh ?

Easy, Pusherman :)

Jeez, I feel like cigars are some sort of gateway drug, and now my dealer is pressuring me into trying the hard stuff :biggrin1:

Simon-JG-hr
23-09-2010, 03:25 PM
I've not tried any other of the Jura line, but the Superstition is a great little whisky! Nice bit of smoke (but not a lot) alongside some sweetness too - like almost nothing else in the whisky world - it's from the islands, but doesn't really have the distinctive characteristics of the region.

I'd still recommend you get your hands on some Glenmorangie Nectar d'Or, extra aged in Sauternes casks - a stunning whisky and should come in at under 50 if you look in the right places. (My 'pushing' it has nothing to do with the fact that I came remarkably close to being named Glenmorangie... :eek: )

Styler
13-10-2010, 01:25 PM
Yay, a discussion on a subject I know about :smile:

Firstly Irish Whiskey and Scottish Whisky really warrant separate threads, I like whiskey for how smooth it is as it's usually triple distilled as opposed to whisky which is generally only distilled twice. I do think that whisky is a lot more complex and robust however which is why I hardly ever drink whiskey. Whether you want to add a drop of water to your whisky (the only thing that should ever be added to it) is up to you, some people say it releases more of the flavours but I don't like it to be honest, I've got no problem picking out the flavours neat.

There is a saying in Scotland that to call yourself a whisky lover you have to appreciate whisky from all regions and not just ones with a specific flavour profile. I think this is very true although there is certainly an established route for beginners from Speyside to Islay (pronounced eye-la for those in far flung shores). The Diageo flavour map that Daverave999 posted will be very useful to anyone getting into whisky but remember that it's not definitive guide to all whisky, it shows mostly Diageo owned brands.

The whisky trail in scotland has changed over the years, it used to be split into Highlands, Lowlands, Islay and Campbeltown. When more and more sweet and light whiskys were produced around Speyside it seperated from the Highlands and became a whisky region in it's own right. Campbeltown is a tiny region in the south west that used to have many, many distilleries but now only has 3 and is often not even included on whisky maps anymore, just integrated into the lowlands. The Lowland area has also suffered from a decrease in distilleries and probably doesn't have many more than Campbeltown. If you want a very rough idea of the lowland/highland divide then draw a line between Glasgow and Edinburgh. The final change to the whisky map comes from the islands on the west coast. Islay has always been a region in it's own right I believe but the other islands were simply part of the highland group. Now however some maps show the islands (Jura, Skye, etc) as a region in their own right which I have to agree with.

Crap, I've just realised how much I've written without actually telling you about any whisky... can you tell I'm bored at work?


Speyside

It's often recommended that beginners concentrate on Speyside first as they have lighter, sweeter whiskys, Glenfiddich is often suggested but I much prefer Balvenie which you can often get good deals on. The Macallan is also nice if you find it cheaper than the other two. I must admit that I don't buy much Speyside anymore unless I see a rare Balvanie expression. These would suit a lighter cigar, something creamy or with sweet notes.


The Highlands

The problem with the Highland region is that, because of it's size, there is a tremendous difference between some of it's whiskys. The further east you go, the more like Speyside it gets and the further west, the more like Islay. Glenmorangie is often mentioned to beginners and while there is nothing wrong with it, I find it a little dull and lacking in complexity. A favourite whisky of mine is Dalmore, it's sweet but unlike the light floral Speyside malts it's much more of a dark fruit sweetness, it's like someone made a really rich christmas pudding and doused it with whisky. That's what it reminds me of anyway! I think this would be great with a medium bodied, spicy cigar or one with bitter chocolate flavours.


The Islands

Highland Park is another oft-mentioned brand that, although it has "highland" in the name, is actually now considered an island whisky as the distillery is in Orkney. It's a great transition between the lightly and the heavily peated, right in the middle. I've seen Jura mentioned a lot here but while it is very reasonably priced, I think there are better whiskys in it's peer group. Wouldn't turn down a bottle though! One of my top whiskys is Talisker from Skye, it's got a lot more peat than any of the above brands while also keeping some spicy sweetness. It's also what I would also describe as a salty whisky, a slightly sharp taste that you often get with island whiskys although I'm not sure where Talisker gets this from as the peat that's used in the fire to germinate the barley comes from near Inverness. If you hadn't already tried Laphroaig I would have suggested this as your first peaty whisky. You're going to want a medium to full bodied cigar for these guys, lots of spice and leather.


Islay

So this is where all the monsters come from, the kind of whiskys that will smack you across the face the moment you stick your nose in the glass. My favourite whisky has to be Lagavulin, even it's standard expression is aged for 16 years and it's an incredibly complex whisky with a lot of smoke flavour as well as peat, one to work towards! Then you've got your Laphroaig which is very salty, I believe this comes from the locally sourced peat which contains a high precentage of seaweed. Ardbeg is another name which always comes up when strong whiskys are mentioned. It's a very light whisky (the opposite of the Lagavulin which is very rich) but it packs probably the biggest peat punch of the lot. These cigars would require a very full bodied, woody, leathery cigar.

Wow, sorry about this. I hadn't meant to ramble on for so long, it's like my intro post all over again! I better go and do some work :(

Edit: Below is the flavour map linked from the Diageo site, it gives an explanation to how the malts are catagorised.

http://www.malts.com/index.php/en_gb/content/view/full/263

Seriesteve
13-10-2010, 01:35 PM
Aye Aye Styler
No doubt a few of these will be making their way across my Lips tonight. As per norm on a wednesday :biggrin:
Have you tried the Glen Dronach 15 yr old Revival yet ? It's a beauty with a Cigar :41:
Ss
"Aye coontin the Minutes" :clock:

Styler
13-10-2010, 01:45 PM
Aye Aye Styler
No doubt a few of these will be making their way across my Lips tonight. As per norm on a wednesday :biggrin:
Have you tried the Glen Dronach 15 yr old Revival yet ? It's a beauty with a Cigar :41:
Ss
"Aye coontin the Minutes" :clock:
I've nae tried it. Heard it mentioned a few times though so it's got to be one of my next bottles. I need to get some cigars to smoke with it first though!

monkey66
13-10-2010, 02:20 PM
Great, informative post, thanks Styler.

daverave999
13-10-2010, 03:05 PM
Nice one Styler! I have to admit right from the very start the Islay malts have been what interested me, so they are still worthwhile trying for those new to whisky.

Styler
13-10-2010, 03:17 PM
Nice one Styler! I have to admit right from the very start the Islay malts have been what interested me, so they are still worthwhile trying for those new to whisky.

I was exactly the same! I think we're maybe in the minority though as I know of a lot of people who has been put off of whisky because they tried something like Ardbeg first. Maybe cigar smokers already have well trained palates!

Simon-JG-hr
13-10-2010, 03:41 PM
I'm in that boat too. Perhaps we could start a club...

bambini
13-10-2010, 03:48 PM
I was given a bottle of Bowmore Legend for my birthday recently. Haven't tried it yet, I'm waiting for my single malt buddy to come round so we can have a go together.

Anyone had Bowmore before?

Styler
13-10-2010, 03:51 PM
Yeah, there's certainly nothing wrong with Bowmore. It's got a reasonable amount of peat but not that strong in Islay standards. It's quite easy drinking for an Islay malt, which is always dangerous :)

peanutpete
13-10-2010, 04:16 PM
good post styler good info

Gordonbcb
13-10-2010, 05:14 PM
Firstly Irish Whiskey and Scottish Whisky really warrant separate threads........................................... .....

Excellent informative post Styler. Well done mate.

And just to add my tuppence worth, I've recently been enjoying Balvennie when indulging in a Montecristo. Seems to me they make a great pair. :smoke:

Seriesteve
13-10-2010, 05:41 PM
I was given a bottle of Bowmore Legend for my birthday recently. Haven't tried it yet, I'm waiting for my single malt buddy to come round so we can have a go together.

Anyone had Bowmore before?
A couple of bottles down here, very nice quite sweet smooth
Not too west coast, if you don't like it I'll do you a swap
Ss

mackem keith
13-10-2010, 07:28 PM
Aye Aye Styler
No doubt a few of these will be making their way across my Lips tonight. As per norm on a wednesday :biggrin:
Have you tried the Glen Dronach 15 yr old Revival yet ? It's a beauty with a Cigar :41:
Ss
"Aye coontin the Minutes" :clock:

i'll second that steve a cracking tipple, assuming thats one we traded a while back, definately worthy of a purchase:smile:

spooner
13-10-2010, 08:00 PM
Wow styler what a great post very informative I love a scotch after mackemkeith got me into it with an auchentoshan which I have to say is my go to malt, however I have tried a lot of others thanks to Keith currently I'm enjoying a dalmore , and with Christmas coming up I hope to have a few stocking fillers. But I'll definatly be using your post and knowledge for some parings....

captain duff
14-10-2010, 12:51 PM
Some really good ideas here. My general view would be that if someone likes brandy, but in the past has found the standard and cheaper scottish grain whiskys to be harsh (and they can be), then either try bourbon (very sweet in general terms) or Irish whiskey (I see it as midway between bourbon and scotch). An Irish malt would be great, or a blended Irish like Black Bush should be tried (sweet, malty, no harshness). And of course, as has been said, scottish malts vary greatly (hence them being so good). A good starting point is actually a blended malt such as Johnny Walker Black Label (and don't be put off by ot not being a single malt - it is still a class product). When it comes to single malts I have very varied tastes, but always come back to Talisker :)

bambini
14-10-2010, 01:20 PM
Any chance we can put Styler's post on the wiki? It's getting a lot of love in this thread, and it's really given me a clear idea of what I should be trying and what to expect.

gt3911
15-10-2010, 01:58 PM
I have little experience with Whisky, but I do enjoy it.

Last night I finished off a bottle of Glenfiddich 12yr, which I enjoyed. I had to nip into Asda today and thought I best get another bottle in - I was initially wanting to go for something Irish, then a box of Jura was calling my name, I was slightly worried as I only skimmed through this thread, I couldn't be sure if this was discussed as a good whisky or wasn't recommend! I gave in and bought it and happily discovered the name was familiar for all the right reasons.

Looking forward to it